The Best of Strength Running in 2018

Strength Running produces so much multimedia material that you might have missed some of our most popular content last year. Never fear, here’s the best so you don’t miss out!

Jason Podcasting

With 2019 underway, I want to help you get started on the right foot (and use more running puns).

Before we press on the accelerator and take the new year by storm, let’s slow down and reflect on the most popular pieces of content from 2018 (and why they were so impactful).

We’ll do this by category:

With literally thousands of individual pieces of content from articles to tweets to videos to photos, this year was a whirlwind of running advice.

Let’s get started!

The Most Popular Video

I’m not surprised to feature this video… it went viral and took off like a rocket when it was published.

And I’m not surprised. How many of us want to run longer with less fatigue? To get more out of our long runs and feel better being on our feet for hours? It’s every runner’s dream!

So I took to the mountains and filmed a gorgeous video featuring Aspens, mountain streams, and trail running:

Of course, the real value here are the training adjustments you can make to make long runs more productive. Perhaps this could be a new strategy for 2019?!

Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel so you never miss a video.

Most Popular Social Post

I started taking my Instagram game to the next level last year. And to do that, I got photos that will make you laugh, cry, or just shake your head.

But the most popular post was actually this beauty:

You see, I was pacing my friend in a half marathon and saw the photographer on the side of the road.

The result? Me being goofy.

Running can be tough sometimes so it’s important to smile and remember how fun it can be.

I hope you enjoy the scenery and have a quick laugh! Give me a follow for more shenanigans.

Most Popular Article

There was a clear winner in the most popular blog article category this year:

Is bodyweight strength training enough for runners?

This piece was written by Amanda Loudin, an endurance journalist that writes a regular column for Strength Running. She pulled in a physical therapist to make this a compelling, no-nonsense piece for runners looking to add strength work to their training

Most importantly, this piece highlights the fact that there must be progression in your strength training – just like in your running.

That means your lifting must get more advanced, complex, and difficult as you become a stronger and more capable athlete. Get this concept right and your injury risk will plummet and your performances will skyrocket.

For a deep-dive on this topic, check out our full strength ecourse.

Most Popular Guest Appearance

Coach Jenny Pod

Earlier this year, I was thrilled to be a guest on the Coach Jenny Show to talk about strength training mistakes and how to structure “elite level” lifting.

Hosted by renowned coach and author Jenny Hadfield, this was a real honor and treat for me!

It was a wide-ranging conversation about:

  • How my own injuries changed my thoughts on strength work
  • The type of strength training for injury prevention vs. performance
  • Balancing strength and running

You can listen to the episode here. A big thanks to Jenny for having me on!

Most Popular Program

high performance lifting

This year we released a new training program called High Performance Lifting – our most ambitious product yet.

I partnered with Randy Hauer, a USAW National Coach, to make it happen. With 16 weeks of progressive, periodized weightlifting that’s good enough for elite runners, there’s no other lifting program for runners on the market.

A videographer filmed two pro runners (Maggie Callahan and Addie Bracy) perform all of the movements at a weightlifting gym in Boulder, Colorado.

And the feedback has been incredible:

  • “2 minutes off my half marathon PR… damn I could tell the difference!” – Joanne
  • “Thank you for your HPL program, my training went exceptionally well with no injuries! HPL was the icing on the cake and I finished 2nd in the 69-74 age category at the Columbus Marathon and really felt strong the entire distance.” – David
  • “HPL is helping me become both a better athlete and runner. Thanks for this awesome program!” – Allison
  • “I was starting with very little strength but I’m surprised how much stronger I’m feeling.  I already notice it in my running, especially going up hills.” – Patty

If you’re ready to take your running to the next level, there are very few better strategies than weightlifting.

Learn more about it here to get an edge over your competitors.

Most Popular Podcast Episode

Mark Cucuzzella Running

Dr. Mark Cucuzzella has the distinction of being the most popular podcast guest for 2018!

Our discussion, titled Mark Cucuzzella, MD on A Comprehensive Injury Prevention Plan had more downloads than any other episode.

I’m not surprised given all we talked about:

  • Running form: cues, mistakes, and big picture principles
  • Barefoot running: how to get started and avoid injuries
  • Lifestyle: what factors predispose you to getting hurt?

For any runner who struggles with injuries, this is the go-to resource for better understanding injury prevention and your own injury cycle. You can’t go wrong with Mark’s book, either.

Want more on this topic? Our free injury series has been enjoyed by tens of thousands of runners just like you.

Most Popular Idea

I’m adding this section at the last minute! In 2018, I introduced several new concepts to the Strength Running community.

None is more powerful than this: the most powerful injury prevention strategy available is your training.

It’s not an ice bath, or heat, or compression socks, or self-massage, or ART, or nutrition, or strength training, or more days off.

Preventing injuries start with how your running is structured (I filmed a video about this here):

  • Are you doing appropriate workouts for your fitness level and goal race?
  • Does your mileage build logically, strategically, and carefully?
  • Is your long run prioritized safely?
  • Does your training progress from where you are now to where you want to be?
  • Is your training periodized to match your goals?
  • Is the overall effort of your training distributed strategically throughout the week?

Runners were surprised because we’ve often been taught that to prevent injuries, we have to add in “extras” (strength work, foam rolling, ice baths, etc.).

But no amount of strength training or other recovery work will offset poor training habits.

Training first. Always training first.

If you want help figuring this part of your running out, we have a lot of options for you!

What Do You Want To See In 2019?

Now, it’s time to chime in with YOUR favorite piece of content in 2018. What most helped your running? What podcast, video, or article most resonated with you?

And more importantly, what do you want to see in 2019?

Would you like to see something new? Or change how I do something on the blog, social channels, or podcast?

Leave your comments below and let’s make this year our best ever!

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Comments

  1. Eli Shearn says:

    There have been some podcasts on running form, but I’d love a podcast on lifting form. What are the cues when Doug various lifts. Where should you be feeling it. What are the differences between lifts that have subtle differences (deadlift vs Romanian deadlift, overhead press vs. jerk). Watching videos is fine but it would be nice to have mental cues as well.

  2. Would love to know how to handle schedule changes while training. For example say my long run is on Friday with a recover run on Saturday and a short run on Sunday. But on Friday it’s freezing rain out and I don’t have access to a treedmill. So I end up doing my long run on Saturday. How should I do the other two runs if at all?

  3. I’d love for you to talk about how to incorporate strength training into a running training schedule. For example: I’m following one of your programs with 4 runs a week and 3 days of rest with some awesome routine after those runs. But what about focused strength training? Should that also be added, and where?